Inclusive Education

Three things I learned are:

1) In the video it stated, “56 percent of kids in this country with intellectual and developmental disabilities spend their entire day in self-contained, separate settings just for kids with disabilities whether it’s classes or separate schools” (Habib, 2013). This surprised me as inclusion has been a talked about topic for several years now.

2) Segregation is maybe about the other children and that maybe we need to show/prove that inclusion benefits typical developing children much more than the children with a disability.

3) The integrated classroom of students that are typical developing along with students with a disability had an average of 15-point increase in their academic achievement compared to the segregated classrooms. This was explained by working collaboratively with peers, and if paired with someone who needed a little extra assistance or coaching that student is much more engaged with the assignment and curriculum and therefore understanding it on a different level.

Two connections I made are:

1) The explanation of why students do better when in an integrated classroom reminded me of Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development where children learn little from performing tasks that they can already do independently. Instead, they develop primarily by attempting tasks they can accomplish in collaboration with a more competent individual. This is when they attempt tasks within their zone of proximal development. It is the challenges in life, not the easy success that promote cognitive development.

2) In the video had the fact that 56% of kids in this country with intellectual and developmental disabilities spend their day separate. This number really surprised me as inclusion has been a talked about topic for several years and was even integrated in the rural school I went to.

One question I still have is:

Inclusion has been proven many times that it benefits everyone. How would you go about integrating inclusion in a school that has never had or believe in the importance of it?

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One thought on “Inclusive Education

  1. Laura,
    I had never thought of inclusion benefitting the classroom as a whole until I watched this. I think that it is a good thing to note when brining up inclusion in topics to a school that has never thought or implemented it before. I also never thought of the zone of proximal development being related to this, but you made some good points. This is proved by what Dan said (and you wrote about) about children learning better and understanding the curriculum better when they can learn from and teach each other, which I think is a very good philosophy to implement in any classroom!

    Like

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